Wednesday, December 10, 2008

On Linux for Netbooks

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After almost 3 weeks (and lots of late nights), my experiment with installing another Linux distribution for my Asus Eee 900 netbook has more or less come to a conclusion. After numerous installation  (Ubuntu, Mandriva, etc), countless reinstallation and testing, I'm settling now with Mandriva One.

I had never spend so much time just on a single objective. Through it all, I must say that at least I had learn a lot more about Linux, beyond the little I had to do sometimes in my work with Unix. Linux on the client is not for the faint of heart. One can easily break the OS from all the hacks and tweaking. I can understand now why Asus's provides little option for changing the delivered Xandros OS. With different kernels, distributions, package managers, windows managers, one wonders if having so many choices (each with their own issues) is such a good thing.

What I have learned from this experience is that tough as it may be, Linux can really be a substitute for MS Windows if you are willing to spend the time learning how it works. Every application I have on my Windows PC has the same or equivalent Linux counterpart, including My Dropbox and Skype, etc. The only application I could find for Linux is the PCSuite for my Nokia phone. Hello Nokia?

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6 comments:

braincrapped said...

I've my EeePC running Debian EeePC and it's awesome.

Evan said...

There are so many distributions available for the Eee on Linux. It really depends on the one's preference in terms of desktops (Gnome vs KDE), windows manager, distribution packages (Debian vs RPM), package delivery (Synaptic vs URPMI), etc...

This is the fun and at the same time the pain.

Fabrice said...

Don't hesitate to consult Mandriva documentation : http://doc.mandriva.com/

and also Mandriva Club : http://club.mandriva.com/xwiki/bin/view/KB/

grege said...

I also have an EeePC 900, and tried Debian Eee before trying Ubuntu Netbook Remix and now plain Ubuntu Intrepid. I purchased a generic Bluetooth USB stick ( $10) and it worked straight away. With standard gnome applications I can move files to/from my Nokia. No substitute for the Nokia Suite, but it does give some functionality.

Jawee said...

Speaking of Nokia, I've been disappointed to see that Nokia hasn't cared much about Linux besides putting it on a few embedded devices. I have a Nokia N800 (I opted to buy instead of an Eee and I think I made the right choice) and it is the most fully functional pocket-sized device I have ever owned.

Evan said...

I had considered the Nokia N810. But since I already carry the Nokia E61i as my mobile, it was way too close. But then I would have to spend days just to tweak the ACPI, partitioning, tweaking, etc. Wouldn't have learn all this Linux stuff. Fun, fun, fun...